CAROLYN JESSOP ESCAPE PDF

After all, her own father had three wives by the time she was in fourth grade. Last month, the FLDS was in the news when its leader, Warren Jeffs, was found guilty of being an accessory to rape for forcing a year-old girl in the group to marry her year-old cousin. Jessop, 38, tells her extraordinary story in a riveting new book, Escape Broadway. How did you feel? Carolyn Jessop: I was shocked.

Author:Nern Bam
Country:Philippines
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Music
Published (Last):13 November 2012
Pages:252
PDF File Size:17.67 Mb
ePub File Size:7.24 Mb
ISBN:858-4-75313-527-5
Downloads:17147
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Gagal



After all, her own father had three wives by the time she was in fourth grade. Last month, the FLDS was in the news when its leader, Warren Jeffs, was found guilty of being an accessory to rape for forcing a year-old girl in the group to marry her year-old cousin. Jessop, 38, tells her extraordinary story in a riveting new book, Escape Broadway. How did you feel? Carolyn Jessop: I was shocked.

I was devastated. I really had my heart set on going to college. Did you try to escape? I had watched my sister make an attempt to try to get out of an arranged marriage. She got dragged back, right? She did. Plus I had nobody to contact for help. I never was allowed out of their sight the entire time until the marriage took place [a few days later]. The beginning of your marriage must have been like rape. I was just shocked. Your salvation, basically, depends on whether your husband wants you in his life or not.

I think that most of us in the community thought the same because it was pretty obvious that the woman he liked to have sex with was the one who could get shoes for her kids and the basic necessities she needed, and the other women in the family had to just basically go without. Oh, tremendous. And, of course, the woman who has the most favor with her husband is going to rule over the other wives and their kids. Those families were so enormous. Your husband had 50 children.

How did anybody pay the bills? Life is not the same as normal society. So somebody is going to have to go without the basic necessities they need. The other thing is, we worked really hard. There might be one woman who would try to maintain life in the home, and then everybody else had to work. I worked as a teacher and I gave Merril all my money. It was just a mandatory requirement.

He pays the bills and then he gives you back what he feels you deserve or need. If he chooses to give you nothing back, then you just have to deal with that. He also had the power to decide whether he wanted to eat out at fancy restaurants and eat steaks, and we went without groceries. As a man, that was his choice.

If I had seen you on the street, would I have immediately known that you were religious? Oh, yes. My entire life, I never dressed normally. I dressed like the fundamentalists do in the community right now, with the exception that their dress code is a lot more rigid than when I was there. You had to wear a dress or skirt that was mid-calf, six inches below the knee at least.

And you had to wear long sleeves and something with a high neck. You just had to have everything covered. You describe physical abuse and beatings. How widespread was that? It was a big part of the culture. Dominance and control. It was all to maintain the work of God. It was just a fundamental part of life. I think that in the community people did have their limits when it came to physical violence of what was okay and what was not okay.

And so there were cases of extreme violence in families and people viewed that as not being okay. But a man was believed to have the spirit of God and he could get divine revelation from God that pertained to his family. If he had a revelation that in order to get a wife in line physical violence [was required], then he was within his right to use whatever means he needed to have control of his family. Mostly it pertained to children. It was frowned upon for a man to beat his wife, but they did it all the time.

After having been brought up that way, what made you realize that what was going on was wrong? In the religion, we believed that men are not supposed to favor [one wife over another]. It happened all the time and everybody knew it happened and it was kind of a way of life. A lot of men might have their favorites, but then they were a little more careful about how badly they treated the rest of the family.

The first statement he made after I married him was that a dog was better than a new wife because a dog was more loyal. I just felt that was completely wrong.

How long did the process of leaving take? Nearly three years. I tried to get some help, to get some protection from Merril. I saw Warren. And Warren told me that Merril was a good man and I was an immoral woman for criticizing my husband. I was sick of it. It was just more abuse and more battery. It was getting very scary, the things that Warren was talking about. What was scary? He was talking about moving people to what he called "The Center Place. The main thing that held me to the life was my family and the fear of being alone and not being able to see them.

To me it became very scary at that point. I knew I had to run. I see him as a very dangerous man. I see him as a man who has destroyed thousands of lives. He is so radical and extreme.

TURNING TOYS WITH RICHARD RAFFAN PDF

Carolyn Jessop

When she was eighteen years old, Carolyn Jessop was coerced into an arranged marriage with a total stranger: a man thirty-two years her senior. Merril Jessop already had three wives. He decided where she lived and how her children would be treated. He controlled the money she earned as a school teacher. He chose when they had sex; Carolyn could only refuse at her own peril.

KNIHA MORMON PDF

Polygamy Survivor Carolyn Jessop

Subsequently, she sued for custody of her children, and in became "the first woman ever granted full custody of her children in a contested suit involving the FLDS. It was published by the Broadway division of Random House. She is a sixth-generation descendant of a polygamous family, all of whom were faithful members of the FLDS church. Jessop describes her relationship to her parents as emotionally distant, with her father dominating her mother, and her mother taking out her anger on the children with such regularity that the children soon devised a strategy to get their beatings "out of the way" in the mornings. She spent most of her childhood in Colorado City, Arizona. She graduated from high school at the age of

Related Articles