INTO THE DARKLANDS PATHFINDER PDF

Sign in to create or edit a product review. Flavourful Overview Jhaeman — Dec 16, , pm In the official Pathfinder campaign setting of Golarion, the vast subterranean reaches of ancient empires and degenerate monsters is called the Darklands i. On the other hand, I really liked the several maps that show how the surface world overlays various entrances and different areas of the Darklands. The interior of the book is separated into five parts. The first part, "Exploring the Darklands", takes up 16 pages and provides a good overview.

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Sign in to create or edit a product review. Flavourful Overview Jhaeman — Dec 16, , pm In the official Pathfinder campaign setting of Golarion, the vast subterranean reaches of ancient empires and degenerate monsters is called the Darklands i.

On the other hand, I really liked the several maps that show how the surface world overlays various entrances and different areas of the Darklands. The interior of the book is separated into five parts. The first part, "Exploring the Darklands", takes up 16 pages and provides a good overview. Connections between the layers are rare, and most surface-world expeditions to the Darklands go no further than Nar-Voth. After a brief list of common languages and terminology, the section spends several pages summarizing with one-paragraph each known points of entry to the Darklands.

This part will be quite important for GMs, and the amount of flavour provided even in the capsule descriptions makes just getting into the Darklands seem like an exciting adventure in itself.

Next up is a section on hazards, including mundane dangers like getting stuck or lost, as well as more exotic threats like toxic fungi and radiation. This part is excellent, as it provides a wealth of detail to make travel in the Darklands really come alive--everything from travel time through different types of tunnels to dealing with bad air to navigating in total darkness with a doubling of random encounter chances if the PCs use light sources!

Players will quickly realize they have far more than just monsters to worry about in a Darklands-based adventure. The second part of the book covers Nar-Voth the upper layer in about 12 pages.

The most common denizens of Nar-Voth Derro, Duergar, Troglodytes, and Vegepygmies each receive several paragraphs of description. Derro are still creepy as heck, but I was most surprised to read how something that seems really stupid like Vegepygmies can be given a surprisingly interesting backstory.

The section concludes with several pages describing notable locations in Nar-Voth, and a useful map shows where these places are both from a Darklands perspective and from a surface perspective. The middle of the book fittingly details the middle layer of the Darklands, Sekamina 14 pages. The Drow are described in ways very similar to how they are in the Forgotten Realms, and I think there are some links provided to the Second Darkness AP.

The stuff about ghouls was fascinating, and I could imagine some excellent adventures using their cities as a location. Other important races to receive focussed-coverage are Skum and Svirfneblin, with about a paragraph each devoted to driders, gugs, morlocks, ropers, Serpentfolk, and Seugathi.

As with the previous section, this one ends with several pages detailing particular locations on the layer. Most are interesting, but I would have liked to see some adventure-hook ideas to help GMs provide reasons for PCs to visit them.

Orv, the lowest layer, is covered in ten pages. I thought this was the most original and interesting take on the Darklands. Orv is known, even to most inhabitants of Nar-Voth and Sekamina, only by legend. The only widespread inhabitants of Orv today are a scary race called urdefhans detailed further in the next part of the book , but particular Vaults are home to creatures like neothelids, intellect devourers, and aboleths.

Orv is a strange and dangerous place, and perhaps a good alternative to plane-hopping for high-level groups of PCs who outmatch most things on the surface world. The last section of the book is a bestiary. Five different creatures each receive a full two-page spread: Morlocks, Serpentfolk, Seugathi, Urdefhan, and Vemerak.

In sum, I would say the book is excellent and almost indispensable for adventures set in the Darklands. Talyseon — Dec 19, , am Once again, Golarion breaks from the pack.

Detailing the lands below, a complex somewhat orderly ecology exists miles below the surface. A must have suppliment. Eric Hinkle — Sep 28, , am Then you will love this book. The division of three layers, and regions reminded me a little of Ravenloft domains in a good way. The GM is not obligated to have everything in the mix but rather to focus on what they want. Now to the content itself. Oh, and neothilids!

A great hollow earth pulp feel. My main issue is with the Sekamina, the 2nd layer. PDF is good quality.

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The Darklands can be divided into three distinct layers, each with their own characteristics, inhabitants and hazards. It is mostly composed of a series of cave networks connected by lengthy twisting tunnels. For a cave network to be considered part of this region, there must be a connection to the region of Sekamina below. This region consists of a vast underground warren of tunnels that span continents. Most of the entrances to Sekamina require traveling through Nar-Voth first, but it is believed there are exceptions.

FRUCTOSURIA PDF

Into the Darklands

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