JOHN GERARD HERBALL PDF

While the Spanish were the first to introduce American plants to Europe, explorers from other countries soon followed. Gerard was one of the most respected plant experts of his time, but, strangely, he was not the primary author of the famous herbal that bears his name. His picture of the potato was the first that most English people had ever seen. At first, the plant caused some confusion. According to legend, Sir Walter Raleigh ate the poisonous berries of the potato plant, not knowing that the edible part was underground the potato is of the same genus as the Deadly Nightshade.

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Life[ edit ] Early life and education[ edit ] Gerard was born at Nantwich , Cheshire, towards the end of , receiving his only schooling at nearby Willaston , about two miles away. Nothing is known of his parentage, [1] [2] but the coat of arms on his Herball implies he was a member of the Gerards of Ince. Mason had a large surgical practice and had twice held the rank of Warden in the company, and later became Master.

It is thought he resided in a tenement with a garden belonging to Lord Burghley. After his death in February , he was buried at St Andrews, Holborn on 18 February, but the grave is unmarked. He became a member of the Court of Assistants board of directors on 19 June , despite being accused of defaming the wife of a colleague in This became popular, and he received gifts of seeds and plants from around the world.

He also received offers to supervise the gardens of noblemen. Amongst his qualifications he wrote "by reason of his travaile into farre countries his great practise and long experience". There is no evidence for this claim and nothing seems to have come of his application.

Many of these had fine gardens and would exchange plants. Garth, who described Gerard as "a worshipful gentleman and one that greatly delighteth in strange plants" had South American contacts from where he would import rarities. He also exchanged plants with Clusius and cultivated a certain "Captain Nicholas Cleet of the Turky Company" from whom he obtained specimens from the Middle East.

James and Master Huggens, keeper of the garden at Hampton Court. To this day Yucca bears the name Gerard gave it. This list was the first catalogue of this type ever produced. The only known copy is in the Sloane collection at the British Library. George Baker describes this garden in his preface to the Herball as follows "all manner of strange trees, herbes, rootes, plants, floures and other such rare things, that it would make a man wonder, how one of his degree, not having the purse of a number, could ever accomplish the same".

As curator of the College garden, he would have been familiar with Priest, and his work. Norton decided to proceed with publication despite these difficulties. However, Gerard was then faced with the difficulty of matching them to the text and frequently mislabelled them.

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John Gerard

Life[ edit ] Early life and education[ edit ] Gerard was born at Nantwich , Cheshire, towards the end of , receiving his only schooling at nearby Willaston , about two miles away. Nothing is known of his parentage, [1] [2] but the coat of arms on his Herball implies he was a member of the Gerards of Ince. Mason had a large surgical practice and had twice held the rank of Warden in the company, and later became Master. It is thought he resided in a tenement with a garden belonging to Lord Burghley. After his death in February , he was buried at St Andrews, Holborn on 18 February, but the grave is unmarked.

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The herball, or, Generall historie of plantes

Only those plants for which he gave specific culinary applications have been listed here. Clicking on the link above will take you to a facsimile of this edition. Each new discovery was compared with what was known, and was assigned a "temperature" and "vertues" according to the humoral theory and doctrine of signatures still in use at the time. Gerard also shows us the beginnings of scientific thought in those instances when he dismisses information given by his ancient Authorities, and discusses what he himself has found to be true by experimentation.

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